7 Important tips before getting pregnant

No comments
getting pregnant,tips to get pregnant,how to get pregnant,how to get pregnant fast,pregnant,before you get pregnant,7 things to do before getting pregnant,trying to conceive,things to do before getting pregnant,tips on getting pregnant,trying to get pregnant,how do i get pregnant,things to do before you get pregnant,pregnancy,what to do before getting pregnant

Being able to create life is undeniably one of the most beautiful gifts bestowed on women. Deciding to start or grow your family is exciting. Preparing your body and mind is one of the best things to do before getting pregnant. There are things you can do now before you try for a baby that will affect your fertility and the health of your baby. To optimize women's fertility, taking better care of their bodies is a good first step. But what else can women do to improve their odds of having a healthy baby?

Tips.

Get out of toxic intakes

If you smoke or take drugs, Before pregnancy is the time to stop. Many studies have shown that smoking or taking drugs can lead to miscarriage, premature birth, and low-birth-weight babies. There are others you might not know about, such as vitamin A, found in over-the-counter skin care products. Pesticides and other chemicals can also be dangerous, as well as unpasteurized dairy products. Do your research, and consult with a medical professional if you have concerns.

Start taking prenatal supplements

Make sure your body is in great shape before getting pregnant by eating a healthy diet and taking a prenatal supplement. These supplements contain folic acid and vitamins and minerals necessary for healthy conception, fetal development, and pregnancy. Folic acid needs to build up in your body to provide maximum protection for your baby against neural tube defects. Many women conceive within one month of trying so it is advised to start taking folic acid two months before you stop contraception.

Also check to make sure that your multivitamin does not contain more than the recommended daily allowance of 770 mcg RAE (2,565 IU) of vitamin A, unless most of it's in a form called beta-carotene. Getting too much of a different kind of vitamin A can cause birth defects.
Talk to your health care provider about any supplements that you currently take or if you got any uncertainty about the kind of supplements to take ; some of them may not be suitable for pregnancy, and you may need to switch them out before getting pregnant.

Stop contraception.

This might seem obvious, but if you have a hidden form of long-term birth control, you might forget about it during preconception. Hormonal contraception can require a bit more planning. All you have to do to reverse the effects of the Pill, the patch, or the ring is to stop using them a couple of months before you plan to even start trying. This gives you a bit of time to see what your natural menstrual cycle is like (27 days/ 32 days), so you can figure out when you're ovulating, the time of the month when you're most fertile. If you've been taking the pill for a while, your cycle could be different from what it was before you started. It can take a while for hormone levels to get back on track after you ditch the pill, but if your period's still MIA after three months, you should see your doctor.

Schedule a preconception visit.

Many experts recommend booking a pre-pregnancy checkup at your ob-gyn at least three months before you plan to start trying, especially if you don't see the doctor regularly. You'll want to make sure you're up-to-date on vaccinations, checked for STDs, tested for heart-health issues like high blood pressure and cholesterol, and make sure that any chronic conditions, such as diabetes, asthma, or thyroid problems, are in check. 

Male partners too need to visit an internist, most men see doctors far less regularly than women. A regular physical can help ensure he has no chronic conditions or is taking medications that may affect sperm count or cause other fertility problems.

Eat right

When you're thinking about having a baby, it's really important to eat a  right healthy food. Eating a healthy and balanced diet will help you stay well throughout pregnancy and be good for your baby’s health. The best foods include wholegrain, unsaturated fats and vegetable proteins such as lentils and beans.

Seafood are highly nutritious but before pregnancy it is important to understand which types of seafood are healthy to eat and which are not. Some seafoods contain mercury which can cause birth defects, and women can inadvertently consume it through fish during pregnancy. You should avoid species like swordfish and king mackerel during  preconception to make sure your system is clear when you conceive. During pregnancy, you should limit fish like tuna and salmon to a couple of servings of a week, so get into this habit now. Don't eliminate fish altogether — when eaten as recommended, it provides healthy omega-3 fatty acids.

Also consuming too much caffeine while you are trying to conceive can increase the risk of miscarriage. The research shows that this applies to both women and men. Too much caffeine in pregnancy has also been shown to be harmful to the developing baby.

If you’re planning to conceive, you and your partner should consider limiting your caffeine intake to 200mg a day.

Do research on your family’s medical history

One of the important things to do before getting pregnant is looking into your family's medical history. Talk to your mom , sisters, aunts, and grandmas, if you can. Did it take them a long time to conceive? Were there any complications, like preterm labor or having a breech delivery? Certain health conditions tend to run in families, and it's a smart idea to brush up on your history and share any relevant information with your doctor. But don't worry too much. Just because it took your sister a year to get pregnant doesn't mean you'll necessarily have a hard time too. Many common fertility problems, like poor egg quality (due to age) or blocked or damaged fallopian tubes, are not hereditary, but some, like fibroids or ovarian cysts, can be. Your doctor can help you understand which, if any, family issues can affect your fertility or pregnancy so you'll be better prepared to deal with them later.

Visit your dentist

It may seem totally unrelated to fertility, but getting your teeth and gums checked out before pregnancy is another wise move.Pregnancy causes hormonal changes that increase the risk of developing gum disease which, in turn, can affect the health of your developing baby. Women with unchecked gum disease are more prone to miscarriage, preterm birth, and preeclampsia. In fact, brushing, flossing, and seeing the dentist regularly can cut your miscarriage risk by up to 70 percent.






No comments

Post a Comment

Contact Me

Name

Email *

Message *